Author
Topic: Are there actually different accepted names for repeater notes?  (Read 4634 times)
friedsquid
  • Very Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,852
  • CPMS 1593

I know there have been previous posts but looking for quick answer

are there actual so called "accepted" names used for reapeater notes and exactly how many or what is classified as a repeater. I have heard the terms class 1 and class 2 repeaters
Is there a limit to the numbers in the pattern?
ie 1212121, 1234123, 1231231,1234561(almost ladder ;D) etc
Are they all called something different ?
FRIEDSQUID



Always looking for #1 serial number notes in any denomination/any series
canada-banknotes
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 732
  • CNA Member 21689 and CPMS Life Member 100
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2007, 10:33:24 am »


To my knowledge there is no current description of repeaters in the Charlton catalogue.  There is also no official standard for the nomenclature of serial numbers with repeating sequences of numbers, with the exception of radars of course.

Just like the term "insert" has been used to describe replacement notes, certain unofficial classes of repeaters have been created to help describe the different types of repeating serial number notes that can be found, and their statistical frequency of occuring.

The following post from rachelsprivates should help clarify this for you:

Quote
You are correct, Mike, they have the same rarity.  Every stack of 1000 consecutively-numbered notes has one radar and one B-class repeater.  The only reason repeaters are not worth as much is that they are not collected as widely as radars.  I know my interest in B-class repeaters (i.e. of the form ABCXABC where X = any number, including A B or C) is very limited and I would only buy old notes that fit this category.  A-class repeaters (i.e. of the form ABCABCA) are 1:10,000, and because they don't occur in every stack of notes, they should be worth more than radars.  Again, though, radars are well-established as collectible numbers, repeaters are not.  An article in the CPMS newsletter or an entry in Charlton would change that.



Contributor, Charlton Catalogue of Canadian Government Paper Money, 19th, 20th, 21st, 22nd and 29th Edition
Pricing Panel Member, Charlton Catalogue of Canadian Government Paper Money, 21st Edition 2009
Hudson A B
  • Very Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,503
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2007, 12:06:16 am »

If you look at the cyclical pattern of the digits,

ABCABCA   is a "Cycle 3"  or a "3-Cycle".  The digits form groups of threes, which are then cycled over and over again.

ABCDABD is a "Cycle 4"  or a "4-Cycle".  The digits form groups of fours, which are then cycled over and over again. 

(and ABABABA is not a "Bicycle" haha - I know someone would call on that one....
ABABABA  is a "Cycle 2", or "2-Cycle".

Before anyone jumps on me about terms not being formally addressed in the Catalogue,  these terms have been introduced in the past on the forum, and are truly accurate in their description as to what the numbers actually do (Moreso than Class A or Class B repeaters etc... - wouldn't a class A repeater be like 5555555?   ;))

Anyway, yes they are all seeming to become more popular from what I am understanding.

Whatever it ends up being called, or whether it gets in or not remains to be seen of course.  I'll be saving them anyways  :)

CPMS Lifetime Member #1502.
friedsquid
  • Very Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,852
  • CPMS 1593
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2007, 06:29:24 am »

Quote
ABCDABD is a "Cycle 4"  or a "4-Cycle". 
I assume this is just a typo and  should it be ABCDABC?
 ;D
Quote
ABCABCA   is a "Cycle 3"  or a "3-Cycle". 
not a tri-cycle ???
« Last Edit: May 25, 2007, 06:33:04 am by friedsquid »



Always looking for #1 serial number notes in any denomination/any series
Hudson A B
  • Very Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,503
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2007, 08:46:07 pm »

Tricycle!  lol.  Forgot about that. Yes it was a typo. You wrote it correctly.

Thanks-
H

CPMS Lifetime Member #1502.
 

Login with username, password and session length