Author
Topic: Common or Something?  (Read 2055 times)
ikandiggit
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« on: June 11, 2011, 09:16:59 am »

I found this note this morning. The "20" is outlined on the reverse side probably from picking up the ink from the adjacent note.

Any premium for this? This is the first I've come across.

friedsquid
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« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2011, 11:09:10 am »

I have seen this error quite often, especially on $5 notes in bricks.
I kept one that was in gem unc. but In my opinion are not rare.




Always looking for #1 serial number notes in any denomination/any series
ikandiggit
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« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2011, 11:48:53 am »

Thanks. I'll just hang onto it until a better example comes along.
mmars
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« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2011, 03:09:36 pm »

I've seen plenty.  The ink used for the large 20 counter is applied heavily, so it likely takes longer to dry, and stacking the sheets when the ink is not completely dry is how these ink transfers happen.  Technically it is an error, though I suspect similar transfers could be produced artificially (have not tried it, I'm not that desperate to entertain myself lol).  Hence there would be no value for circulated examples.

The three lower denominations have different degrees of lacquer applied to them and I think this is why the "error" is more common on $5 bills as Squid points out.  The $5 bills have thick lacquer, $10 bills have somewhat less lacquer, and $20 bills have very little if any.  The lacquer inhibits moisture absorption by the paper, so the ink has to dry by releasing water vapour to the air.  This is particularly true for the design elements printed on the holographic strip which is covered by an extra layer of polymer material.  $20 bills put into water will curl up around the holographic strip and edges as the paper gets wet.  This does not happen with the $5s or $10s, though maybe it will if you soak them long enough.

(Yes, I deliberately used the word "bills" in place of "notes" above.  I'm a real stinker.)  :-X

    No hay banda  
ikandiggit
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« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2011, 08:03:39 am »

Thanks for the explanation.

I use "bills"when I'm at work but on the forums, I use "notes" or "banknotes" which involves a lot of editing. :)
Seth
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« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2011, 06:34:54 pm »

The Bank of Canada itself uses "bills" and "notes" interchangeably.  So I think we can too without sweating too much over it.   ;)

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