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Topic: 1870 shinplaster INVERTED DESIGN  (Read 5540 times)
mmars
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« on: December 11, 2012, 04:02:30 pm »

Here's an interesting piece I acquired...

The green 25 counters are upside down on the face.  The back design is also upside down relative to the black face design.  I would think that this means the green tints are printed BEFORE the black design, so it's really the black face design that is upside down relative to the rest of the note.

I was not sure if I should post this here or in the Dominion notes section.

{http://img850.imageshack.us/img850/8599/dc1cerror.jpg:http://img850.imageshack.us/img850/8599/dc1cerror.th.jpg}

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coinboy
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« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2012, 06:46:46 pm »

wow so after a closer look U have the better of the two known errors...E27ii....face tint and back normal,black face printing inverted....see page 409 in CGPM

coinboy
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« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2012, 07:12:04 pm »

woops pg 415...was lookin in last years book

mmars
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« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2012, 10:51:51 pm »

My catalogue only goes up to page 380...  :D  Guess I better get with the times!

I found the listing... very last page, tucked in after replacement note errors.  What a strange place for it.  Anyhow, yes, I have to say this made my day.  Having the green 25 counters upside down on the face adds another 4k to the value in addition to just looking neat as all heck.  Christmas came early, I guess.

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mmars
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« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2013, 03:58:51 pm »

Here is another inverted design shinplaster, this time with just the tint on the back being upside down...

{http://img268.imageshack.us/img268/3735/ohnz.jpg:http://img268.imageshack.us/img268/3735/ohnz.th.jpg}

(If image does not load above, try this URL: http://img268.imageshack.us/img268/3735/ohnz.jpg )

This one is a B series with a piece of another note visible on both sides.  The poor cutting and oversize dimensions are not technically an error, but they make the inversion of the back design that much more obvious.  In other words, if this note was squarely cut with straight edges, it would be hard to convince someone of the error on the back unless they had the note in hand.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2013, 03:50:37 pm by mmars »

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mmars
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« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2013, 03:31:48 pm »

OK, I know I'm biased because I own the note in the previous post, BUT something is bugging me...

The back-of-the-book section of the Charlton catalogue contains special serial numbers and error notes together.  Consequently, people treat the pricing in these areas the same, meaning they use the same percentages to calculate values of circulated notes.  Clearly, the pricing schedule for special serial numbers does NOT apply to error notes because errors are errors regardless of grade.

Just look at the example for 1870 Inverted design shinplasters (E27)... The note shown in the previous post is valued at $2,500 for the error.  But an 1870 series B shinplaster in Unc is currently priced at $3,250.  WHAT THE HECK??  The error note is worth LESS than the non-error in Unc??  Because of discrepancies like this, I have to regard the error price as a premium.  Add the two numbers together ($3,250 + $2,500) and you get the REALISTIC price expectation for a rare old error note in Unc.

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canada-banknotes
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« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2014, 11:40:49 am »

OK, I know I'm biased because I own the note in the previous post, BUT something is bugging me...

The back-of-the-book section of the Charlton catalogue contains special serial numbers and error notes together.  Consequently, people treat the pricing in these areas the same, meaning they use the same percentages to calculate values of circulated notes.  Clearly, the pricing schedule for special serial numbers does NOT apply to error notes because errors are errors regardless of grade.

Just look at the example for 1870 Inverted design shinplasters (E27)... The note shown in the previous post is valued at $2,500 for the error.  But an 1870 series B shinplaster in Unc is currently priced at $3,250.  WHAT THE HECK??  The error note is worth LESS than the non-error in Unc??  Because of discrepancies like this, I have to regard the error price as a premium.  Add the two numbers together ($3,250 + $2,500) and you get the REALISTIC price expectation for a rare old error note in Unc.

It is good to see that the Charlton catalogue pricing panel realized the true scarcity of the inverted errors of the 1870 25¢ fractional note, and that very few are found in grades greater than Fine.  I guess someone must have read your post and realized the validity of your concerns.

They have updated their description in the 27th Edition 2015 (page 424) to state that "Prices for E27-i and E27-ii are for notes in Fine condition."

In 25+ years of collecting I have only seen two of the E27-ii 1870 25¢ fractional note with Inverted Face Plate Printing (face tint and back normal, black face printing inverted).  This leads me to believe that only one sheet of 10 notes with this error was probably printed.



Contributor, Charlton Catalogue of Canadian Government Paper Money, 19th, 20th, 21st, 22nd and 29th Edition
Pricing Panel Member, Charlton Catalogue of Canadian Government Paper Money, 21st Edition 2009
 

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