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Topic: 1865 canadian one dollar.  (Read 17566 times)
tom.frost
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« on: April 22, 2013, 02:21:07 pm »

Hi everyone.

This is my first post so please be gentle.

When my grandfather passed away, he left his chatels to my father. In his desk was a canadian bank note. Its dated 1865 and signed by a mr woodside. It seems to have been printed or over printed by the continental  bank note company. It also says on it  royal canadian bank. It has a picture of a blacksmith on it. Also the numbers 2734. I can't find any information on it, all records i can find start at 1866.

Any help you can give is most appreciated.

Thank you.

Tom.
stashthecash
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« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2013, 02:37:46 pm »

can you post a scan or picture of the note
tom.frost
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« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2013, 02:44:30 pm »

Ill try.
tom.frost
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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2013, 03:01:30 pm »

This might work.
tom.frost
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« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2013, 03:14:02 pm »

Wizard1
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« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2013, 03:34:41 pm »

Welcome! No need to be afraid to post here! We're all here to share and learn about our hobby!

The Royal Canadian Bank had two printers print for them for their 1865 Issues. American Bank Note Company and the Continental Bank Note Company

Yours was printed by the latter.

One difference between the notes is the line "At its banking house in Toronto" or "At its banking house in Montreal" in between the Bank's Name and the Bank's Seal.

The one with Toronto should have a Blue "T" stamped on the face and back of the note

Yours on the other hand is the Montreal version. Your note seems to be rather scarce as pricing is "Not Confirmed" in the Charlton Catalogue

For your reference the Charlton Catalogue Number for this note is 635-12-04-01
« Last Edit: April 22, 2013, 03:41:40 pm by Wizard1 »

Bob
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« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2013, 07:59:48 pm »

What a splendid note!  Dude on the left is the Duke of Wellington, nemesis of Napoleon Bonaparte.  The Royal Canadian Bank was an Ontario-based bank that went into business in 1864 and operated with limited success for 12 years.  It merged with the City Bank, Montreal, on 10 May 1876, to form the ill-fated Consolidated Bank of Canada.  All notes of the Royal Canadian Bank are rare.  You are very fortunate to have one.  It isn't redeemable but you don't have to worry about that.  Many of us would cheerfully redeem it in gold coin!

Collecting Canadian since 1955
Bernie
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« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2013, 08:57:03 pm »

Fabulous note. I suggest that you write a short article for the Canadian Paper Money Journal on this discovery note. I would include the personal history behind it.
tom.frost
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« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2013, 03:57:49 pm »

I wanted to thank you for the kindness you guys have shown. My dad was so chuffed with the information you have given us. He thought you might like more of the story.

I'm not sure i mentioned, but we live in the uk, which made the discovery of a canadian note all the more strange for us. We live in essex, on the east coast, and have been millers and farmers for many generations. My father told me more about the discovery of the note. He found it, as i said, in my grandfathers desk, which is an old english oak antique. The desk has hidden compartments, which my dad found when he explored it. The note was found in an old purse, in one of these compartments, amongst some old english farthings. We don't know if my grandfather put it there. We do know my grandfather inherited the desk from his great aunt sarah, whose brother lived in canada during the 1880's' so it is conceivable  that is how it came to be in the uk.

Any way, i hope that is of some interest to you all, and thank you again for your help.

Tom.
tmort
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« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2013, 11:50:35 pm »

Great story. Neat to hear the history or potential history of this bill. That is a keeper.
Thanks for sharing!



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Rupiah
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« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2013, 10:17:17 pm »

Wow. I think this note would say a lot if it could talk. I am sure that this note felt really good knowing that there are people who truly value its existence after so many years being preserved in one form or another.

Thank you

Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
tom.frost
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« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2013, 02:07:54 pm »

Would i be correct in thinking the second signiture would be Mr Mathew Hamilton Gault?
Bob
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« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2013, 03:41:43 pm »

By George, I think you've got it!
The signature compares very closely to the known M. H. Gault signature on Exchange Bank of Canada notes.
It certainly makes sense that Gault would sign the note as he is known to have been Montreal manager of the Royal Canadian Bank from 1866 to 1870.

Collecting Canadian since 1955
tom.frost
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« Reply #13 on: May 02, 2013, 03:13:13 pm »

Sorry to keep asking questions, but do we need to keep the note protected from light and air etc?
Bob
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« Reply #14 on: May 02, 2013, 05:46:35 pm »

air good, light bad.
You might like to acquire a Mylar sleeve at a hobby supply shop to house it safely.

Collecting Canadian since 1955
 

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