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Topic: Canadian 2$ 1954 NO SERIAL NUMBER  (Read 14491 times)
champac
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« on: January 12, 2015, 11:57:23 am »

Hi.

I have a Canadian 2$ bill 1954 with NO SERIAL NUMBER. I already send the 2$ to Canadiancoincertification.com and they return me back the 2$ telling me that the bill was a true one. But they can't certified the bill beaceause the quality is too poor.
I want to know how much i can have for this rare bill is i deceide to sold it ? See pictures.
Thank you.

Christian Champagne.

« Last Edit: January 12, 2015, 12:31:39 pm by BWJM »
friedsquid
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« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2015, 12:51:27 pm »

Quote
But they can't certified the bill beaceause the quality is too poor. 

This is the first time I have heard of a TPG refusing to grade a note because of poor quality...
Has anyone else ever heard of such an instance?
Could it be that they cannot confirm that the error is real so they just won't certify it to avoid responsibility?
« Last Edit: January 12, 2015, 12:54:07 pm by friedsquid »



Always looking for #1 serial number notes in any denomination/any series
Gary_T
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« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2015, 01:07:15 pm »

Looks like this $2 went through the washing machine. I think this is worth $2 if you sell it.

Gary_T
friedsquid
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« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2015, 01:17:24 pm »

Looks like this $2 went through the washing machine. I think this is worth $2 if you sell it.

I tried to avoid being so blunt....thanks Gary :)



Always looking for #1 serial number notes in any denomination/any series
BWJM
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« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2015, 03:40:17 pm »

I'd give it away as a tip at a restaurant.

BWJM
Member of CPMS, RCNA, ONA, ANA, IBNS, WCS.
Treasurer, Waterloo Coin Society.
Show Chair, Cambridge Coin Show.
Fellow of the Ontario Numismatic Association.
friedsquid
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« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2015, 04:49:54 pm »

I'd give it away as a tip at a restaurant.

You must be loaded...I can't afford to tip that big  ;)



Always looking for #1 serial number notes in any denomination/any series
mmars
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« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2015, 02:53:25 am »

Hi.

I have a Canadian 2$ bill 1954 with NO SERIAL NUMBER. I already send the 2$ to Canadiancoincertification.com and they return me back the 2$ telling me that the bill was a true one. But they can't certified the bill beaceause the quality is too poor.
I want to know how much i can have for this rare bill is i deceide to sold it ? See pictures.
Thank you.

Christian Champagne.

I had a look at the full-size images, and I can't see any evidence of wrongdoing.  Removing the serial number (if it was there) would also very likely remove other design elements, and I just don't see that.  A trip through the washing machine would have caused a lot of fading.  This note looks like an average well-circulated note.  Maybe if everyone who made a reply had looked at the full-size images, the replies would have sounded less cynical.

CCCS is a mainstream grading company.  That's a very strange response from them.  They are members here, so  maybe they would like to elaborate?

If you believe the note is authentic, maybe try another company like BCS.  But I don't guarantee that they will give a different response or grade the note.  Error note authentication is not their expertise.

P.S. Full size image links:

Quote
http://imagizer.imageshack.com/img910/4858/LHetHW.jpg

http://imagizer.imageshack.com/img537/8585/wBhIY0.jpg

CAUTION: Images are very large.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2015, 02:56:08 am by mmars »

    No hay banda  
Gary_T
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« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2015, 10:04:11 am »

I don't see any evidence of wrongdoing either now that you have provided full scale images but I did not have that when I made my comment. Just because there is no signs of a serial number doesn't mean that it never had some at sometime.
  Going through a washing machine was my way of saying they may have been removed in french. I would not spend hundreds of dollars on an error with a feature removed in this condition.
 

Gary_T
tripoli
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« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2015, 04:14:18 pm »

Even if this was an error, what sort of premium would it attract in this condition?   It certainly wouldn't grade any more than a G 8.

If I was a collector of error notes, I would NOT want this for my collection, it's just too beat up.
walktothewater
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« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2015, 05:28:50 pm »

I think it would sell for about $60.00 - $80.00 but I would recommend putting it up in true auction style (not listing a price) to allow collectors who may wish to add an error to their collection determine what they wish to pay.

I had a similar 1954 $1.00 note in VG (a very circulated with note no serials but with the microprinting undisturbed like this note).  I sold it with a fabricated missing serial number (2 notes) for about $100 a few years ago.  The 2nd note (I labelled "Bonus") which I picked up at a show for $1.00 you could see minor variations to where the microprinting had been altered. I put the 2 items up in true auction style & that may be why they sold for about BV (I believe). 

mmars
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« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2015, 07:16:15 pm »

I think it would sell for about $60.00 - $80.00 but I would recommend putting it up in true auction style (not listing a price) to allow collectors who may wish to add an error to their collection determine what they wish to pay.

I think you are spot on with this, both with the recommendation of selling online and the price expectancy.

It certainly wouldn't grade any more than a G 8.

What's a G 8?  What grading system does this belong to?

If I was a collector of error notes, I would NOT want this for my collection, it's just too beat up.

Well, I am a collector of inverted design error notes only in Gem Unc condition or better, but even I would never tell people that they should avoid a certain note only because it does not meet with my requirements.  There is a strong possibility that the $2 note is not a genuine error, and many collectors avoid notes with missing serial numbers because there is never any supporting evidence that proves 100% that such an error note, regardless of grade, is authentic.  It is hard for us to believe, since we are collectors, that error notes can reach circulation and become worn like regular notes, but it happens.  Most notes, including errors, circulate without detection for their entire lives.  This note has value to someone, and I see nothing wrong with allowing it to be sold without interference.

    No hay banda  
Norum
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« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2015, 04:22:59 pm »

Dear friends! :)
When detecting the absence of the serial number on the banknote bill immediately applies to the Bank.
 Why is no one surprised by the fact that the most popular banknotes in circulation so long been in circulation without attention to the lack of serial numbers?
 The image is very poor quality. That would confirm or deny the originality of banknotes required image quality.
Without high-quality scans to say no about anything.
sincerely yours,
 Norum.
P.S  People who want to get a consultation or evaluation by the bill very often don't use high-quality pictures. Ask advice on poor-quality images, this elementary no respect for the forum members.
My opinion is that there should be a rule, if you want to get the advice you need to make a great scans. O:-)
mmars
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« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2015, 08:19:13 pm »

Why is no one surprised by the fact that the most popular banknotes in circulation so long been in circulation without attention to the lack of serial numbers?

Because the average person just does not scrutinize his/her money.  It's a difficult concept to swallow, I know.  I would also propose that people in the 1960s were not as paranoid about counterfeiting as bank tellers are today.

The image is very poor quality.

I would not say that about the full-size images (links copied from earlier post)...

Quote
http://imagizer.imageshack.com/img910/4858/LHetHW.jpg

http://imagizer.imageshack.com/img537/8585/wBhIY0.jpg

P.S  People who want to get a consultation or evaluation by the bill very often don't use high-quality pictures. Ask advice on poor-quality images, this elementary no respect for the forum members.
My opinion is that there should be a rule, if you want to get the advice you need to make a great scans. O:-)

It has nothing to do with respect for forum members.  Just because technology exists for making high-quality images, that does not mean people know how to use it.  I, for one, am inept to borderline retarded when it comes to photography, but I'm pretty good with scanners.  Many people asking for assessments of notes simply don't know that we need images to make evaluations.  They simply don't know any better when they register on this forum and ask "What is my 1973 $1 note worth?".  If the value of notes was not so completely dependent on grade, then image quality would not be as important.  But the average person who is not a collector and who seeks information simply does not know many of the golden rules about collecting.

As for making it a rule to provide high-quality scans of notes in question... good luck enforcing that rule.  Most people can't even use ImageShack properly to post their images, lol.  I can already envision the result of having a rule about images.  People will equate image size with image quality, and they will produce the same fuzzy out-of-focus images, but instead of those images being the size of your screen, they will be 8,000,000,000,000 by 6,000,000,000,000 pixels and will take hours to download even by high speed Internet connection.  :o   So, umm, no thanks.

What is wrong with simple courtesy, anyhow?  If someone asks a question, we tell them what we need, and if they don't provide it, they don't get their answer.

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Seth
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« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2015, 03:08:00 pm »

Because the average person just does not scrutinize his/her money.

You've got that right. Last night I was in a store and settled a $11.20 bill with a $10 note, a quarter, and a 1979 voyageur dollar. The clerk (looked about 18 years old) took my money and gave me my 5c change without batting an eyelash. It was only as I was walking out the door did I notice her looking at the dollar with a big frown.

Track your Canadian currency online!

http://www.whereswilly.com
walktothewater
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« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2015, 07:23:31 pm »

Quote
Because the average person just does not scrutinize his/her money.
Quote
You've got that right.

I nearly fell over when I got a solid 8888888 $5 that was very well circulated in change.  I also found it disturbing/quite odd when I had to show friends and family how the old Journey was upgraded with new security features. ::)

 

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