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Topic: I did not expect this but.......  (Read 311 times)
Rupiah
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« on: January 06, 2020, 10:42:41 pm »

......I found HCW.

There is a a noticeable change in the manner in which the back varnish has been designed around the window.

Those who have followed my articles in the Canadian Paper Money Journal and read the latest article on varnish designs, will note that I have identified varieties of polymers in all denominations based on the change in design of the varnish around the windows.

The HCW has a new varnish design pattern not seen so far in any of the Frontiers Series notes. This and something else that I have noticed leads me to believe that HCW is not printed with HCU and prefixes before but most likely printed after and more recently.

I am suspecting that there will be HCV and perhaps others beyond HCW.


Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
Rupiah
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« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2020, 05:25:13 pm »


Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
AJG
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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2020, 05:30:55 am »

I remember reading a post some years ago in which a certain user claimed that denominational letter "G" would be recycled on the $10 bill.  Unless he had inside information from the Bank of Canada, and given the drastically low demand for $10 bills lately (with the vast majority of the nation's banks no longer ordering them), I am starting to realize, at this point, that denominational letter "G" will likely appear on the $5 bill and not the $10.  We'll find out pretty soon.

Or, very interestingly enough, could we see the debut of the letter I as a first letter on a prefix?
« Last Edit: January 08, 2020, 05:37:04 am by AJG »
Beatrix
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2020, 02:36:29 pm »

Considering it has been almost 4 years since the first sighting of HCU I was waiting for something later to come, especially since the last few months or so I have seen the "filling-in" of all the previously unspotted serial ranges particularly in the HCF-HCL area. Considering that up to ironically 2 days ago we have had no new news about the next series of $5 I expected them to print one final batch to tide it over until the new bills begin production and release.

Since I'm a recent money hunter and the HCU era comprises 95% of the bills I've gone over to date, it will probably jar me when I find my first HCV/HCW.

As for what comes after HCZ I have no idea, but my speculation is that it would be HGA, INA or JNA. Or, as a shot in the dark, given the recent withdrawal by BAI from banknote printing and the serials of the 2017 $10, will CBN "reclaim" the abandoned letters and go AAU/BNA/CNA?
« Last Edit: January 10, 2020, 02:40:09 pm by Beatrix »
robb4640
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« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2020, 01:19:41 pm »

"There is a a noticeable change in the manner in which the back varnish has been designed around the window.

Those who have followed my articles in the Canadian Paper Money Journal and read the latest article on varnish designs, will note that I have identified varieties of polymers in all denominations based on the change in design of the varnish around the windows.

The HCW has a new varnish design pattern not seen so far in any of the Frontiers Series notes. This and something else that I have noticed leads me to believe that HCW is not printed with HCU and prefixes before but most likely printed after and more recently.

I am suspecting that there will be HCV and perhaps others beyond HCW."

I just logged in the first HCW note on the database even though Rupiah mentions getting one already.  I was wondering what that design of the varnish around the windows is??  I looked at the HCW note compared to other $5 notes and could not tell the difference.
Can you reply with scan or photo?

Rupiah
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« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2020, 10:59:16 pm »

I looked at the HCW note compared to other $5 notes and could not tell the difference.
Can you reply with scan or photo?

Here is an image that shows the condition between the old design (bottom) and the new design (top). Look at the translucent part which is the varnish. The outline of the varnish between the two is noticebably different.

Click on the image to enlarge
« Last Edit: January 14, 2020, 11:05:21 pm by Rupiah »

Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
Rupiah
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« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2020, 11:03:13 pm »


I just logged in the first HCW note on the database even though Rupiah mentions getting one already.  I was wondering what that design of the varnish around the windows is??  I looked at the HCW note compared to other $5 notes and could not tell the difference.
Can you reply with scan or photo?


Forgot to mention that if you get the CMPS Journal there is an article with lots of images showing different conditions of varnish which was in the September 2019 Issue.

Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
Rupiah
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« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2020, 11:06:55 pm »

And HCY has been reported on SNDB

Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
AJG
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« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2020, 11:56:12 am »

I'd say, at the rate we're going, we'll probably find out what the next denominational letter will be before February rolls around.

I wonder if the new varnish format is designed to make the newer bills last longer?  It would make sense, since $5 bills go through so many hands and are very heavily circulated, going through so much wear and tear.

The $10 bill may not rely on such varnish, since it has very low demand and goes through so few hands.  It's no wonder many vending and change machines have no problem accepting tens, but not fives.

It seems as if the reason for the latest surge of fresh $5 bills implies that many of the oldest $5 bills (HB* prefixes, mostly) released during 2013 and maybe 2014 are due to be replaced, since they are likely worn now.  This likely means the life expectancy of a polymer $5 bill, at first, has been roughly six years.  The new varnish on the newer $5s may make them last nearly a decade, possibly.

For what it's worth, when the new $5s came out in 2013, at first I saw heavy exposure of HBJ prefixes - which, today, I seem to see far less often now.  Maybe those older HBJs got replaced by the later HC* prefixes (possibly HCS) which were printed a few years ago.
Beatrix
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« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2020, 02:47:38 am »

I found a good quantity of HCV & HCY and a few HCW during the 6 days I spent in Toronto last week. Right on cue, I find HCV here in Thunder Bay the day I get back.

I hope we see what is after HCZ soon.
 

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