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Topic: Grading and pricing.  (Read 13140 times)
Hudson A B
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« Reply #30 on: October 07, 2005, 02:25:02 pm »

Would it be possible to have holders like this made that have the edges raised? A raised border sort of idea?  That way the face parts wouldn't be rubbing eachother, but the edges would instead.

I think that would eliminate the scratching issue would it not?


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canadianpaper
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« Reply #31 on: October 07, 2005, 04:17:22 pm »

Very informative!
My experience with Andys holders are quite good and I would actually recommend them - but be aware of the scratching issue. The best remedy I found was to keep the bag that they come in and house it in the bag while transporting the notes.
As mentioned above, Id rather have a scratched holder than a damaged note.
I imagine such holders for dominion nontes would be enormous and consequently would be weight prohibitive beyong carrying around 5-6 notes.
Travsy
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« Reply #32 on: October 07, 2005, 09:54:11 pm »

Quote
Would it be possible to have holders like this made that have the edges raised? A raised border sort of idea?  That way the face parts wouldn't be rubbing eachother, but the edges would instead.

I think that would eliminate the scratching issue would it not?



Hi Hudson
Yes it is possible and it would help but not a great deal. If you get a chance take a look at a PCGS coin holder which has raised edges. They are always scratched or scuffed.  
Again the cost issue becomes a factor plus a raised edge note holder would be bulkier still. The more complex the mold the more expensive it is to make and to produce the part itself with a higher waste probablity.
A fair amount of thought went into the design of the holders McKaig uses. Issues such as allowing the note to breathe and not have the holder pressing the note when sealed such as a capital holder does were paramount. It was also determined that the holder should be as sleek and thin as possible yet strong. The holder fits into a regular sized envelope and is very strong so those goals were achieved. Also the pin design that seals the holder together is of a tapered design and as anyone who has actually used the holder will attest, short of throwing it against a wall,it won't open. It can also be perma-sealed easily should one desire it to be.
While there is always room for improvement on any product until the market demand can offset the costs it is unlikely to see any holder that is "ideal" per se.


« Last Edit: October 07, 2005, 10:08:40 pm by Travsy »
canadianpaper
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« Reply #33 on: October 08, 2005, 06:16:55 am »

Travsy,
Agree with your comments, as such products always come with pros and cons - I belive this is a fantastic product. And despite whatever shortcomings it may have - I think the protection of an expensive note with such a holder is well worth it. Ive actually been quite impressed with the tapered pins that hold the two sections togeather - although I cant say that Ive tried throwing against a way to test its durability - perhaps you could try this with one of your notes and let us all now the results - kidding!
Travsy
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« Reply #34 on: October 08, 2005, 11:08:19 pm »

Quote
I cant say that Ive tried throwing against a way to test its durability - perhaps you could try this with one of your notes and let us all now the results - kidding!


I already have.  8)

« Last Edit: October 09, 2005, 12:12:01 am by Travsy »
rscoins
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« Reply #35 on: October 11, 2005, 02:48:02 am »

I have attempted to twist the holders used by Andy McCaig and to defeat their purpose, which is protection of expensive notes that have been certified. Could not make any real dent in it, I couldn't really damage it.

The holder sold by Steven Bromberg (called "Museum View") appears to be real tough. If you twist it with enough force it will deflect, but returns to its normal position when done. This is similar to the holder sold by the BofC for their lasting impressions sets. Scratch resistant, crystal clear, but will shatter will enough force applied. Small sized noted only so far. The price is a few dollars each (not sure of the exact price.)

Rick
Travsy
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« Reply #36 on: October 11, 2005, 10:18:38 pm »

Bromberg's holders are the BoC holders or a direct knock off of them and were not made to "stand alone" so to speak.
A decent holder but again they show the need to sacrifice one thing to get another. In the case of Bromberg's they are made of styrene hence the clarity and lightness but they will shatter. They are about 20% more scratch resistant than McKaig's though.
rscoins
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« Reply #37 on: October 12, 2005, 08:10:53 pm »

Bromberg's holder are certainily similar to the BofC holders. If fact, when the two are compared, they appear to be exact.
Several of the BofC holders are slightly warped, perhaps 1/8 of an inch out of true flat. This shouldn't be a problem however.

You are correct about not able to stand alone, they make a poor display method except when flat. Pages for large holders will hold them, but are clunky and easily bashed about.

Weigh is a little much compared to normal note holders, perhaps something that doesn't matter unless moving them around frequently.

Rick
Travsy
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« Reply #38 on: October 12, 2005, 11:57:50 pm »

Yes the warping in both is because of the plastic and quality of the mold used.
I do know that McKaig could make a virtually scratch proof holder but the cost is truly ridiculous. Between the 2 I think McKaig's is probably the imperfect perfect one. Of course a person can always use a Capital Holder as they make great weapons....
 

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