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Topic: Mismatched Serial Numbers  (Read 3091 times)
Danyel
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« on: August 23, 2006, 01:24:39 pm »

Recently discovered in Sarnia Ontario $50.00 note with the following serial no.

        AHD1180841         AHD6635201

Only the last digit  matches. Most mismatches involve 1 or 2 digits I believe.
Any comments and info greatly appreciated. Note has circulated but is at least
a strong XF. Will send attach jpeg when possible.
Mikeysonfire
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« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2006, 03:25:16 pm »

The 19th edition book says $600 for 3 or more digits mismatched. But you may find someone who would pay more because 6 digits are mismatched. Then again the note is not UNC and may bring the price down.
Archey80
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« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2006, 04:25:16 pm »

Hey this is the only way I could get the picture he sent to up sorry you have to click on the link http://web.mac.com/arthurkershaw/iWeb/Site/Welcome.html

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Tom
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« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2006, 10:23:03 am »

I think this is the note.  Emailed to me to post.

Tom

[attachment deleted by admin]
walktothewater
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« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2006, 06:39:43 pm »

Any idea how such an incredible serial number error could occur?

mrobb
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« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2006, 07:43:22 pm »

How rare are mismatched serial numbers of this magnitude in a high denomination note (50 or 100)?  Also note that the first four digits differ by exactly 5 each.....counter alignment error? Very interested to hear more discussion from the experts on this note.
Tom
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« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2006, 07:57:04 pm »

I have only seen one other example like this, it was on a Journey $10, but all of the numbers were wrong and also a block at the end of the left serial number.  I would guess you probably could get $500 ish for your note.  As to what happened, there is apparently a pin to hold the numbers in position which in this case must have fallen out and freed up the numbers to rotate to where ever they wanted to be.  This is just what I have heard can happen from time to time.  Nice note, but remember, depending on when this error was caught by the printer, there can be thousands of notes floating around out there with the same error.

Tom
 :-/
walktothewater
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« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2006, 10:33:39 pm »

Quote
there could be more errors of this type discovered and that would drag down the value
I'm not too sure that would be the case.  If there were a thousand notes with such a dramatic error, those notes would still be incredibly rare since a 1000/10,000,000 or 1/10,000 is still .0001% of that series.  This is still relatively rare so I doubt the book value would go down.  The BV obviously depends on the condition, and the spectacular nature of an error (which this is).  

What may deter people from buying the note above (and lower its market value) may in fact be that its a high denomination $50 which (in my experience) fewer error collectors collect/or desire.  Its value is probably the same as if it were a $10 or $20 error.

However, its a spectacular error, so that general rule of thumb may also be thrown out the window.  Error and anomalies are being collected by a new breed of collector, so as collecting goes, this realm is evolving, and the high denomination may have little bearing.  Because high denomination errors seldom go to market their BV and market value is not as easy to determine.  This may blow some sellers off this kind of note.

Errors seem relatively under-rated by Charlton.  I think that's because, like specimens, they're collected mostly by pretty serious collectors.  Its hard to say whether they track the trends of errors the same as they track replacements & other rarities. They only seem to be updating the categorization of errors at this time.

If I had an error note like that (or a partially printed $20 I saw earlier on this site) and wasn't a paper money collector, I would definitely sell it to a member here for 2 reasons.  A) they would avoid the hassles with online auctions (deadbeat bidders, listing fees, and the obligatory credit card needed) and B) they'd get top dollar for it now while the market is hot.    

Danyel
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« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2006, 08:28:51 am »

Thanks to all who responded to my request for more information on mismatched
serial numbers. Am considering selling and will likely offer on this site as there seems to be serious and knowledgeable collectors on this forum. Danyel
 

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