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Topic: Explaining the Different Types of Inserts  (Read 2515 times)
50monarch
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« on: May 19, 2007, 07:34:22 pm »

I'm sure I read the difference somewhere on this forum, but I can't find the thread.  I was wondering if someone could explain the difference between the various types of Canadian Journey inserts.  I believe there are only two types; sheet and single.  Single Note Replacements are the new buzz word...how are these different from the sheet replacements and how much more rare are they?  There are a lot of newbies out there (like myself) who may not be completely familiar with the different types.

Any information on this topic would be very beneficial.
X-Savior
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« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2007, 01:29:02 am »

I will attempt to answer this for you, anyone please correct me if I am wrong.

To understand Inserts you need to look at WHAT they do....

Inserts are the same at Replacement notes. They replaced damaged/missing notes during the printing process.

So based on 40/on Sheets (40 Notes in a single sheet of notes) a ream of notes is 1000 sheets stacked on top of each other. This creates a total of 40,000 notes (40 x 1000). So during the printing process a person notices that there is an ink smeer or major damage to a sheet (Various types of error's). What they would do is pull the ENTIRE sheet and destroy it. Then in it's place put an ENTIRE sheet of notes (Sheet Replacement). Now the sheets that are used for Replacements (Inserting) is NORMALLY a complete ream (40,000 notes) but there are time they only use 1/2 a ream (Or other exceptions) but for the main part MOST Insert ranges in sheet inserts are 40,000 Notes (1 Ream of notes or multiples of). So what the printer does is use an entire UNCUT ream of notes (1000 sheets) by placing ENTIRE sheets where required (Sometime one here and one there or a bunch of them all together). This is why the Front and Back plate numbers match the rest of the notes in a brick (They are placed BEFORE the notes are cut). So lets say you get 4 bricks, you will find that in the SAME spot in all 4 bricks there will be an Insert note and in each brick the serial number is EXACTLY 1000 notes apart (each note in a sheet is 1000 notes apart of the next one on the sheet). This will be true of the entire ream of notes the sheet was placed in (As the ream is cut vertically in to 40 Bricks, and there is a layer of inserts  across the bricks)

This is common practice when large amounts of error's occur or happen frequently.  This was the case with CBN most of the time as their quality and printing technology was very outdated.

So once a printer starts to get very good at printing a particular note (British American International) and work out all the "bugs" they do not require as many Replacement notes (Insert Notes) so what happen is they switch to what is known as "Single Note Replacements (SNR)".  This is the METHOD of placing Insert Notes.

The difference with SNR notes is that they are NOT complete reams of notes used for Inserts. What they do is use a COMPLETE ALREADY CUT Brick (With Plate Numbers already) for Inserts (As far less are required). So the Printer grabs a brick of notes and then starts using the notes (In Sequence) as required.  As complete bricks rolls of the printing line and has lets say 2 error notes. So the notes are pulled (Most likely by Computer) and then the first 2 notes of the SNR brick are used (Lets use 33219000 and 001 for this example) . These Plate numbers will not likely match the brick they are being placed in.

So then the next brick that has an error (May be the next brick or 100 bricks away) they would then pull the single or a couple notes (Again by a Computer or automated system) and then place 33219002 and 003 (The Next notes in the brick of SNR Notes). Again not matching the plate numbers of the brick they are being placed in.

So SNR Notes are MUCH more rare as you can NOT predict that brick will have a SNR Insert (Not to mention there is 1/40 the number of Inserts) and if you get 4 Bricks in sequence there might only be 1 SNR in one of the bricks (This has been seen with some as there might be 25 Million notes change and you might only increase in the SNR Brick by 200 Notes). This is also why the ranges are 1000 notes. They eventually use up the entire brick and then they go on to a fresh brick (Whatever is available to use).

So what we are seeing is that BAI is now to the point that Inserts are not being used often so they do not need to use entire reams of notes to replace damaged ones. Over time we will find fewer and fewer Insert ranges (and Notes) as Printers pride them selfs on how few Replacement notes are required. This was a major factor in the HPA Inserts right at the time that CBN was for sale (Make things look good in the books!).

I hope this helps and feel free to ask if anyone needs this further clarified.  :)

« Last Edit: May 20, 2007, 02:37:16 am by X-Savior »

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friedsquid
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« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2007, 07:37:00 am »

Quote
So lets say you get 4 bricks, you will find that in the SAME spot in all 4 bricks there will be an Insert note and in each brick the serial number is EXACTLY 1000 notes apart

The question I have here then is last week when I got 2 sealed wrapped bricks individually bundled as always and untouched the last bundle of the one brick contained 34 AOT inserts (as per my description earlier re finding AOT in AOT )
and the second neighbouring brick contained absolutely no inserts at all. According to the statement you made since the FP and BP numbers on the inserts were the same as the FP and BP numbers on the other notes in the brick then these inserts I found should be sheet replacements yet if they were sheet replacements then why were none found in the neighbour brick?
Could they actually be SNR and not sheet replacements.
Curious.

FRIEDSQUID



Always looking for #1 serial number notes in any denomination/any series
JWS
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« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2007, 09:26:38 am »

Hello FRIEDSQUID,

It is possible to have consecutive bricks with sheet inserts in one and not in the other.
When two consecutive bricks cross a ream boundary, with one brick the last brick of one ream and the other the first brick of the next ream, one may have sheet inserts while the other does not.
I have seen that in bricks from both "full", and "mini" reams.
JWS
CMNWEALTH
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« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2007, 10:02:23 am »

I understand the concept of spreading replacements across an entire sheet. But what is the difference between a full and mini ream ! 
X-Savior
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« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2007, 10:09:22 am »

Quote
It is possible to have consecutive bricks with sheet inserts in one and not in the other.
When two consecutive bricks cross a ream boundary, with one brick the last brick of one ream and the other the first brick of the next ream, one may have sheet inserts while the other does not.

I have actually had this happen to me on several occasions.  ;)

When you cross the invisible line and when you get to where you expect the Inserts to be then.... NOTHING!!!

I think JWS could better explain Mini-Reams....


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friedsquid
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« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2007, 10:20:01 am »

So then by looking at the actual serial numbers posted if the next bricks serial numbers were in a different ream then that would explain it but if they were not say in the next 40000 range then what?
May be a dumb question but all new to me
FRIEDSQUID



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JWS
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« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2007, 10:50:18 am »

Hello CMNWEALTH,

If you wish to learn all about reams and mini-reams, please follow the link below.
You will find it most enlightening.

http://www.members.shaw.ca/collectorsgallery/BlackBoxMystery-01.htm

JWS
JWS
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« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2007, 12:18:47 pm »

Hello friedsquid,

The link in my previous post will answer your question as well.
You may be looking at a mini-ream boundary.
JWS
CMNWEALTH
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« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2007, 04:48:41 pm »

I spotted the Non-Compliance within the Standard Matrix with 5 seconds, before scrolling down. I think I'm Rainman. I understand how all pertinent data be made available to further understand the mysteries of the B.A.B.N. printing facility. I think we need somebody inside it's probably much quicker, but for now I'll brush up on my math and let operation insert flow across my synapses. :o

Thx for the link !
 

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