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Topic: Hybrid banknotes  (Read 9046 times)
kai
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« on: November 14, 2008, 06:08:16 pm »

This is fairly new, since 2005. Only 9 notes issued so far (by 7 countries). This is one collection that you can say that I got them all! Anyone with new information on Hybrid banknotes, please feel free to post your comments. Thanks.
BWJM
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« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2008, 09:15:19 pm »

Could you explain what is meant by the term "hybrid" banknotes?
friedsquid
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« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2008, 09:48:35 pm »

Could you explain what is meant by the term "hybrid" banknotes?
From what I have heard, a hybrid note is a combination of paper and polymer.



Always looking for #1 serial number notes in any denomination/any series
kai
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« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2008, 10:24:18 pm »

I am not an expert on this topic but let me see if I can explain it to you. A Hybrid note is basically referred to banknotes printed on part cotton paper and part polymer. The non paper part comprises of a polymer strip of vertical translucent band which usually cover a see-through register and the transparent window is usually in oval or square shape. For example of a Hybrid note is that Bulgaria commemorative 20 leva issued in 2005 or the recent Tonga 100 Pa'anga note. At the moment, only 2 companies printing them, G&D and DLR. Other countries have issued Hybrid notes are Fiji $100 (2007), Kazakhstan 10,000 Tenge, Samoa 50 & 100 tala (2008), Latvia 100 lats and Qatar 100 and 500 Riyals (2007). Most notes are printed on high denomination, except the Bulgaria note.
kai
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« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2008, 07:50:00 pm »

For those who are interested to find out more, here is my website that display all Hybrid banknotes issued since 2005. It is expected that Bermuda will issued a complete set of new  Hybrid banknotes early next year.

http://au.geocities.com/hybridnotes/hybrid.htm

Enjoy!
kai
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« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2010, 06:04:35 am »

I have now moved my site to blogspot at

http://hybridbanknotes.blogspot.com/

I am also keen to get in touch with collectors from Canada who is interested to exchange current Canadian/Australian banknotes with me. Please feel free to contact me if you are interested.

I am only looking for current issues only, vise versa.

Thanks
« Last Edit: April 28, 2010, 06:07:33 am by kai »

Welcome anyone who wish to exchange uncirculated banknotes with me. Many Thanks
kai
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« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2010, 06:43:44 pm »

Apart from the Euro and Switzerland, the new Gibraltar 100 pounds to be issued in 2011 will also be a hybrid note too.

Welcome anyone who wish to exchange uncirculated banknotes with me. Many Thanks
polymat
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« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2010, 03:55:09 pm »

new hybridtestnotes from GOZNAK / RUSSIA !

{http://www.polymernotes.de/europa/russland/goznak/goz-000-001-a.jpg}

{http://www.polymernotes.de/europa/russland/goznak/goz-000-001-b.jpg}

{http://www.polymernotes.de/europa/russland/goznak/goz-000-001-c.jpg}
kai
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« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2010, 07:24:37 pm »

I have just uploaded the Vanuatu Vt10,000 (US$102) polymer note on my site. Feel free to view the note.

http://paperbanknotes.blogspot.com

Vanuatu is the 33rd nation to issue polymer note. Is Canada going to be the 34th nation to do so? Time will tell.

Cheers

Welcome anyone who wish to exchange uncirculated banknotes with me. Many Thanks
Rag Picker
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« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2010, 02:12:39 pm »

Thanks for the links Kai.  For the benefit of those who do not know what a Hybrid note is, would it be possible to include a definiton somewhere and for the Polymer notes too?  I couldn't find either definition anywhere and I'm sure there will be some visitors who won't have a clue what you're talking about. :)

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kai
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« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2010, 06:56:52 pm »

Hi Rag

I am sure some readers here should be able to help you on this. Even thought I am a keen collector of both polymer and hybrid notes (paper too – oh well, what the heck, I collect all kinds of banknotes), I am not an expert in this field. However to simplify the answer, this is how I would describe them: -

Polymer/plastic notes
Any banknotes made from plastic. One of those that you can’t put it under a hot iron as it will shrink (been there and done that, on an UNC polymernote too LOL!). Plastic note was first printed by ABNC back in 1980 for Haiti (50 Gourdes P235Aa). Material used was called tyvek, a kind of plastic nowadays that they used it on re usable envelope (internal purposes), protective clothing etc. I am sure they used tyvek on many other things too. Please Google/Bing for more details. Since then, ABNC also issued tyvek plastic notes for Costa Rica (one note) and Isle of Man also released one too (both around 1983). In addition to that 50G, it also released another 50G (P235Ab), and also the 1G, 2G, 100G, 250G and 500G. These Haiti tyvek notes are now hard to get. The tyvek note technology was a total failure due to the ink used get smuggled in a humid environment condition. ABNC also printed some other tyvek notes for few of their clients in the Latin America region for marketing purposes (same design of those paper notes in circulation at that time), but none of those countries took up the offer.

Then in 1988, Australia issued one $10 polymer note to celebrate 200 years of European settlement in Australia. In 1996, Australia fully converted all cotton based paper notes to polymer. NZ followed in 1999, and then Romania, Vietnam, PNG (yes/no) and Brunei, with Brunei $10,000 (CND$7,730) as the largest polymer note face value note ever issued. Today, most polymer notes printed are for those highly circulated notes, usually those lower denominations. Vanuatu is the latest entrance to the Polymer note world.

Hybrid Note
Now, what can I say? This is what I have posted on my site some time ago.

“A Hybrid banknote is basically referred to banknotes printed with part cotton based paper and part polymer. The non paper part comprises of a polymer strip of vertical/horizontal translucent band which usually cover a see-through register and the transparent window either in oval, rectangle or square shape. The band comprises of approx. up to 15% of the total banknote size. Like all security features, the strip was adopted to discourage potential counterfeiter. Initially only two printing firms produced notes with such technology, namely Papierfabrik Louisenthal, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Giesecke & Devrient (G&D) Germany, and De La Rue (DLR) of United Kingdom. DLR's motto is to make life easier for their customers and more difficult for the counterfeiter. The security features printed by G&D and DLR are called "Varifeye" and "Optiks" respectively.

In 2008, Papierfabrik Louisenthal came up with a new generation of new Hybrid banknote printing technique. Instead of the originally polymer strip and a transparent window like those earlier issues, the new Hybrid note comprises of a thin layer of protective film laminated on the paper note. This kind of banknote is intended for use in countries with particularly challenging circulation conditions. Such technology will provide durability on the note without sacrificing the security features and printability. This technology is already in use for the Swaziland 2008 commemorative issues (Celebrating the King's 40th Birthday and Swaziland Independence). The main advantage of such technology is that all the banknote's security features can still be clearly identified even after long circulation, both by the general public and by automatic banknote processing systems.

Until recently, the term Hybrid has been described mainly as paper substrates that combine synthetic with cellulose fibers or paper substrates with an aperture or window which is sealed with a film overlay. With Louisenthal's technology, the inner core of the substrate is a traditional cotton fibre-base construction which is protected with a thin film, laminated to both sides, each around 6 microns thick. The combine weight and thickness of this hybrid note is the same as those conventional paper substrates ie 95 gsm.

It has also reported that Durasafe is developing a slightly difference Hybrid note comprises of a fusion of paper and polymers, with the paper sandwiching the polymer core and is being developed for the new Swiss series of banknotes to be introduced some time in 2010.

Whilst polymer banknotes technology is still proven to be the better option, perhaps Hybrid banknotes are more economical to manufacture but not as cheap as those traditionally cotton based banknotes. The recent release of a Papua New Guinea 100 Kina may have something to do with this. Papua New Guinea fully converted all banknotes to polymer in 2008 and yet they decided to release two commemorative notes on 23 April 2009, one in paper (20 Kina) and the other Hybrid (100 Kina). It looks like Hybrid banknote is getting popular in the expense of polymer.”

Rag, remember that I an not an expert, and like many members here, just a keen banknotes collector.


Welcome anyone who wish to exchange uncirculated banknotes with me. Many Thanks
kai
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« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2010, 07:10:14 pm »

This is very important to all collectors in Canada. As we are all eagerly awaiting for the new polymer note arrival in 2011, including ME, I thought I should mention this to all readers just in case you are not aware of this.

Should you come across any error polymer notes been offered, PLEASE be very, very careful, especially those so called error notes with missing print parts. Chances are those are fake error. The most common type are those with only one side printed (ie either the obverse or reverse is blank) or with a trip or certain part with no print. I won’t tell you how this can be done, but this kind of error is home made. Given that Canada will be releasing new Polymer next year, I am sure some of these will appear in the market for those unsuspected buyers.

If you have bought one recently, please feel free to email me with the scan and I can tell you if that was a fake error or not.

Just beware!

Welcome anyone who wish to exchange uncirculated banknotes with me. Many Thanks
kai
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« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2011, 04:49:05 pm »

I am looking for the Tajikistan latest Hybrid note of 500 Somoni released on 10.9.2010. Readers out there, if you can help, please feel free to contact me via http://hybridbanknotes.blogspot.com

Many thanks

Welcome anyone who wish to exchange uncirculated banknotes with me. Many Thanks
 

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