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Topic: Curious about $1 Bill  (Read 6812 times)
co11insmom
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« on: October 02, 2009, 04:54:26 am »

I wound up with a $1 bill in fair condition (serial E13986487* 1969) and was curious as to the meaning of the star and possible value. I work at a casino and come across some unusual things-I have a $10 bill with yellow ink from the 50's, but don't have a book or know where to start...
BWJM
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« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2009, 08:37:01 am »

Hi co11insmom,

Star notes as they're called are replacement notes. The wrappers from original bundles direct from the Bureau of Engraving and Printing explains them briefly: "If the numbers on notes in this package do not run in sequence, the substituted notes are indicated by a 'star'." Essentially, if they had to pull one or more notes because they were in some way defective, they would replace them with specially-prepared star notes.

Your note, which judging by the serial number is very likely from Series 1969A, would be worth approximately USD $8 if it is in perfect condition. If it is in circulated condition, its value would drop to just above face value.

I hope that helps,

BWJM, F.O.N.A.
Life Member of CPMS, RCNA, ONA, ANA, IBNS, WCS.
President, IBNS Ontario Chapter.
Treasurer, Waterloo Coin Society.
Show Chair, Cambridge Coin Show.
Fellow of the Ontario Numismatic Association.
Oldbucks
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« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2009, 01:06:52 pm »

"I have a $10 bill with yellow ink from the 50's,"

That has me stumped. In the 50's the only $10 notes produced were Federal Reserve notes with green serial numbers and seals plus Silver certificates with blue seals and serial numbers.

The only yellow seal notes in a $10 denomination would have been Gold certificates with a date of 1928 or WWII emergency currency issued in North Africa/Italy. They would be dated 1934 and have a yellow seal with blue serial numbers.

Jeff.

"Monstra Mihi Pecuniam" - Member of the Society of Paper Money Collectors - SPMC
BWJM
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« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2009, 01:10:21 pm »

It's possible that the sun had a bleaching effect on the green ink causing the serial numbers and seal to appear more yellow than green. But of course without seeing, this is all just guesswork.

BWJM, F.O.N.A.
Life Member of CPMS, RCNA, ONA, ANA, IBNS, WCS.
President, IBNS Ontario Chapter.
Treasurer, Waterloo Coin Society.
Show Chair, Cambridge Coin Show.
Fellow of the Ontario Numismatic Association.
Seth
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« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2009, 12:03:21 am »

I remember reading years ago that the green ink on U.S. bills was once made up of a mixture yellow and a blue dye.  It was possible to use various chemicals (alkalines and acids, IIRC) to remove either or both of the dyes.  So it's possible that your note had the blue dye removed, leaving the yellow behind.

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