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Topic: Canada Make 2011 Polymernotes  (Read 6790 times)
polymat
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« on: April 12, 2010, 05:42:48 pm »

==> http://lunaticg.blogspot.com/2010/03/canada-switch-to-plastic-currency.html

i search all infos from press / pictures etc.
can your help ?

thank you
« Last Edit: December 20, 2010, 08:22:59 pm by polymat »
polymat
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« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2010, 08:22:35 pm »

http://www.portageonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=20226&Itemid=468

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Get ready to say goodbye to those old, crumpled, and sometimes ripped bills in your wallet or purse, because about a year from now the Bank of Canada will begin phasing them out. Senior Analyst Ginette Crew tells us late in 2011 new polymer bills will be phased in, with paper bills starting to be removed from circulation. The polymer notes will feel significantly different than today's paper bills, featuring a very smooth texture.
 
Crew says the polymer bills will further increase the security of the Canadian cash supply, and stay ahead of counterfeiters. She tells us by using polymer the Bank of Canada will be able to put advanced security features into the bill, making them that much harder to counterfeit. Crew adds the polymer bills are more durable lasting two to three times longer than the current cotton based bills, meaning reduced costs because fewer bills will have to be manufactured during the lifetime of the series. On top of that there will be a positive impact on the environment, because fewer bills will have to be produced. Crew says other central banks are also going down the polymer path, most notably Australia and New Zealand.

Crew says the new polymer bills will be another step in deterring counterfeiting. The latest cotton-based series of bills to be released, called Canadian Journey, incorporated new security features right into the paper. For the first time ever, Canadian notes contained a ghost image (watermark), and a woven security thread that appeared as metallic dashes on the back of the notes. The other new and most visible security feature was a colour shifting metallic stripe.
 
So what about the well recognized, colourful nature of our money... will that be part of the new polymer series? Crew says it's still too early to talk about the design of the new bills seeing how their introduction is about a year away. With that said, she tells us the Bank of Canada does do a lot of research with stakeholders when designing new bills, and they feel they have a pretty good idea about what Canadians like about their bills.
 
Paper has served us well for a very long time. The Bank of Canada's notes have been printed on paper since its first series was issued in 1935. As continual improvements were made to security printing from one series to the next, the paper held up.
polymat
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« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2010, 09:10:07 am »

http://www.torontosun.com/news/torontoandgta/2010/12/26/16676671.html

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A shop clerk’s traditional query, “Will that be cash or plastic?” takes on a whole new meaning next year.

Mostly secret plans to finally issue Canadian banknotes on plastic-based material are well under way.

But nine months after the federal budget announced new currency, Bank of Canada and Department of Finance staff remain tight-lipped about imagery and when the bills will be unveiled.

Officials even refused Toronto Sun requests to confirm or deny Queen Elizabeth’s image will make the cut. She’s on the $20 bill, but former prime ministers are on the other four.

Bank of Canada spokesman Julie Girard would only say “there will be certain legacy features,” cautiously suggesting “culture” and Canadian themes.

“It will be late 2011 that we’ll issue the notes,” she said recently.

The federal agency will retain two private Ottawa security printing firms to produce Canada’s folding money, but she wouldn’t reveal the source of the polymer-based material, since “we’re still in contractual negotiations.

“It’s two to three times more durable and lasts longer than current cotton-based notes,” Girard said. “There is definitely a cost savings.”

Such currency “is harder to counterfeit, but easier to verify,” she said.

Counterfeiters routinely adapt their forging methods with each new banknote series, which undermines the public’s confidence in Canada’s money when word spreads, Girard said.

“Security is the main reason we put out new notes. We go through a lot of testing,” she said. “We don’t produce new banknotes in months ... it takes years.”

Girard said 67,000 bogus bills worth $3.4 million were seized in 2009 — far less than in previous years, before the current currency which contained new security devices including watermarks and holographic metallic strips.

There are 1.5 billion banknotes worth $51 billion in circulation. The Bank of Canada annually releases about 300 million new notes through chartered banks, and withdraws about 250 million to be destroyed.

Girard said final costs remain unknown.

More than 50 countries have switched to plastic-based currency, printed on three types of material, including polymer-paper hybrids.

Almost two-thirds, however, are on Securency International Pty Ltd. polyethylene polymer, according to a leading website on banknote dealers. The 14-year-old firm was created by the Reserve Bank of Australia and a Belgium-based pharmaceutical company.

Australia’s first polymer currency was issued in 1988. Although criticized for shedding some engraved surfaces over time, they are widely accepted as longer-lasting, heat-resistant, creasable and untearable.

The current Aussie series has a see-through clear plastic portion with an imbedded holographic device.

Securency “has a factory in Mexico,” said Bret Evans, managing editor and associate publisher of Canadian Coin News. There have been reports that Canada’s new notes will be printed on material from the Mexican plant, “but it’s been speculation.”

Formed in 1933, two years before releasing its first currency in a smaller size than previous 1870-1920s Dominion of Canada notes, the Bank of Canada has produced a new series about every decade with upgraded security features aimed at thwarting counterfeiters.

Officials have deliberately not released details early, Girard said. “We want to be sure we don’t tip off counterfeiters.”

Sources said test runs were made on plastic-based material prior to the current notes being released from 2001 to 2004, but due to unacceptable results, they are printed on cotton-based paper.

Girard said talks continue with suppliers, scientists, chartered banks, vending machine companies, “stakeholders” being consulted about designs to ensure Canadians are comfortable with topics, plus printing firm staff. They include engravers who carve intricate main features on metal dies that produce a raised “feel” which forgeries lack.

Final costs for the new series and money-handling machinery have not been tallied, Girard said, adding there are “some tradeoffs” to produce more-secure currency.

She revealed the practice of a “staggered release” of new denominations will continue over time.

But unlike with the first Bank of Canada series in 1935 that featured the country’s only $25 bill, the new series will have “the same denominations,” Girard said.

ShareBear
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« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2010, 01:31:34 pm »

I don't think that Polymer notes are going to stop counterfeiting.   It stop the guy who prints banknotes on him printer at home but the professionals are still going to make counterfeit polymer banknotes.  There are many places in the world where if you have enough start up capital you can print money, make subway tokens, coins.

It might even be easier to pass these notes because the BOC is promoting how safe these notes are.

I believe that the BOC needs to do a few things to eliminate or reduce counterfeiting. 

1.  They need to make all notes prior to the current series in circulation non-redeemable except at the BOC after a certain period of time.  This will eliminate older series being counterfeited. 
2.  They need to educate people better on the security features of our currency.  Everyone should check their money. 99% of the people don't check their money.  It is quite easy to pass a fake to a cashier and have it passed back to another customer.

When I was in South America everyone checks their bills both the cashier and the customer and they check for 3 or 4 of the different security features.  Damaged or repaired bills are not accepted.  This includes US and local currency.  Some of the bills even have small stamps on the back indicating that they were check by a bank.

Counterfeit polymer bills have already shown up in New Zealand and they are almost as good as the real thing.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/rodney-times/4346908/Counterfeit-money-does-the-rounds


polymat
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« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2010, 06:16:37 pm »

Are you scared? what? what is not copied to the world? do you have at home in your apartment everything, but everything really original? I think you are also counterfeiting at home, even if it is only the slightest what you use daily. banknotes for the new, there will be a new security feature! LATITUDE call it, here are some infos about it.

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LATITUDE™ is an optically variable device (OVD) that is integrated into the transparent window area of the substrate and allows for design freedom, which enhances the security of the banknote. Through tilting the banknote, multiple images and optical effects are observed.

{http://www.securency.com.au/images/content/Latitude4.jpg}

{http://www.securency.com.au/images/content/Latitude_full_sheet_medium.jpg}

I collect a good 15 years since polymer banknotes counterfeiting at home and I have it. the press on all bags. these can not distinguish wrong is really blind, here a pictures.

{http://www.polymernotes.de/bilder/2010/5k-chile-falsch.jpg}

polymat
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« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2011, 02:12:39 pm »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7chpllnU-To

http://www.bankofcanada.ca/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/spencer.pdf

{http://www.polymernotes.de/amerika/kanada/can_100_001_at.jpg}

{http://www.polymernotes.de/amerika/kanada/can_100_001_bt.jpg}
« Last Edit: June 20, 2011, 02:23:38 pm by polymat »
polymat
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« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2011, 03:56:31 pm »

{http://www.polymernotes.de/amerika/kanada/can_050_001_at.jpg}

{http://www.polymernotes.de/amerika/kanada/can_050_001_bt.jpg}
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« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2011, 12:37:16 am »

I really like the look of the new Banknotes and was quite thrilled to see their release.  Here are a few more links that I found including the official BOC video as well.

http://winnipeg.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20110620/boc-money-unveiling-110620/20110620?hub=WinnipegHome

http://www.news1130.com/news/national/article/243360--bank-of-canada-unveils-plastic-money

http://www.bankofcanada.ca/banknotes/bank-note-series/polymer/

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