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Topic: Microprinting on the Polymer Notes...  (Read 7589 times)
JohnnyG5
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« on: March 30, 2012, 07:44:03 am »

All:

I was taking a close look at the $50 note and noticed that if you take a look with a magnifying glass at the curve that's on the left side of the note, that appears light lighter in colour and goes 'through' the hidden numbers maple leaf, you'll notice it's microprinting. It repeats 'Bank of Canada 50 Banque Du Canada" in a diminishing font size. Of course the same is on the 100, repeating 'Bank of Canada 100 Banque Du Canada'.

Tiny!

John


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Seth
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« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2012, 01:22:10 pm »

Nice find. I hadn't noticed that. There's more microprinting on the backs, in those horizontal striped areas on the far left and far right.

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JohnnyG5
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« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2012, 10:10:43 am »

I thought there might be some microprinting there when I got my $100s, but never fully checked it out. The only hidden, if I can use that word, micro printing on the Journeys is the denomination in between the maple leaves (almost typed maple leafs  ???), in the large counter on the right. 

This polymer stuff opens up some possibilities, huh?

John

Paper Money is Art!
BWJM
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« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2012, 10:38:22 am »

The only hidden, if I can use that word, micro printing on the Journeys is the denomination in between the maple leaves (almost typed maple leafs  ???), in the large counter on the right.

There are a few instances of microprinting on the Journey notes.  See this image for the locations, then look at your own notes to see for yourself.
{http://img542.imageshack.us/img542/7041/bc64aiezw4650002f.jpg:http://img542.imageshack.us/img542/7041/bc64aiezw4650002f.th.jpg}

Apologies for the low-quality original note in the image.  Similar microprinting exists in the same locations on other denominations.

BWJM
Member of CPMS, RCNA, ONA, ANA, IBNS, WCS.
Treasurer, Waterloo Coin Society.
Show Chair, Cambridge Coin Show.
Fellow of the Ontario Numismatic Association.
JohnnyG5
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« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2012, 09:11:34 am »

Of course I know about the areas on the journey 20 that Brent has pointed out. It's just that there are some obvious security features and some not so obvious security features. The denomination in the large counter on the right is one of the not so obvious. Can't put all your eggs in one basket.

'Nuff said.

Let's start a pool as to when a fifty is printed on 100 polymer!  :D

John

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racoon
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« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2012, 07:13:34 pm »

Did anyone notice that there are no printed year or issued year on the new $50. polymer notes. 
Will that mean that over the years they will eventually be reprinting same prefixes?  How will we
know in which year the bills have been printed ?
friedsquid
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« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2012, 08:04:16 pm »

If you look on the front of the note in top right hand corner there is an issue date 2012 :)



Always looking for #1 serial number notes in any denomination/any series
CA_Banknotes
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« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2012, 09:08:53 pm »

If you look on the front of the note in top right hand corner there is an issue date 2012 :)

I would expect that to refer to the year the note was issued, not the year it was printed as it has been throughout the Journey series.

Would be cool to know what year the notes were produced- the BOC had a ton of prefixes printed seeing as how fast the new polymer notes replaced the paper $100s and now the $50s. In the $100s we've seen EKA-EKP and EKZ which probably means they printed 220-230 million notes before the rollout, enough to replace most of the paper $100s. With the $100s lasting for so many years, we could be going the way of Australia, who for example, didn't print $100s for 9 years after massive Y2K stockpiling.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2012, 09:16:26 pm by CA_Banknotes »
 

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