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Topic: Skip-200 printing: are insert notes coming to an end?  (Read 12558 times)
coinboy
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« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2014, 08:00:03 pm »

It's very likely in fact I'm sure they are from a sheet replacement range...GP's Jan. list

mmars
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« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2014, 09:49:49 pm »

There are currently no insert ranges for $5 and $10 notes within the SNDB.

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Rupiah
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« Reply #17 on: January 15, 2014, 11:37:14 pm »

I guess there is such a thing as asking a stupid question.  I wasn't looking for Cnl.  Saunders to give up his secret recipe.  Just curious on how BPN and FPN work.  I may not be asking the question right as I am very new to the collecting of bills.  Take care.

You don't have to feel that way. An excellent place to start is to look at the US Bureau of Printing and Engraving.

Here is a the link to the main website: http://www.moneyfactory.gov/

Here is a link to the production process: http://www.moneyfactory.gov/uscurrency/theproductionprocess.html

I am not sure if you have seen the videos from the Bank of Canada website. Although they do not specifically talk about the plate numbers you will get a good idea about the process.

And if you watch carefully you will see their Single Note Inspection system at work. These videos are found at:

http://www.bankofcanada.ca/banknotes/bank-note-videos/

One of the good books to get is the book published by the Bank of Canada called the Art of Bank Note Design.

Of course if you want to get a lot of technical information about the research done on skip numbers etc. I would suggest that you get access to the Canadian Paper Money Society publications. As a member you can get access to them on-line.

Good Luck

Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
Dean
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« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2014, 02:49:51 pm »

I watched Chris Hadfield's video clip and I could have sworn that the $5 bill he had did not have serial numbers on it!   ???

Am I seeing things or did the BoC give him an incomplete/specimen note?

Dean

Seth
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« Reply #19 on: January 16, 2014, 06:54:04 pm »

About the numbering devices, I would think that the reels are electromechanical and probably informatized.  I would think that the reels, instead being linked as in an odometer (once a reel reaches the number 9, the reel at its left tuns by one when this reel turns to 0), each reel is independent and can be individually commanded at will via a software included in the computer wich runs the printing machine.

I've wondered that as well. Does anyone know for sure what printing process is used for the serial number on polymer notes? I've heard letterpress mentioned (as in previous issues) but it looks similar to laser etching to me.

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Seth
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« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2014, 06:55:05 pm »

...which reminds me. Has any serial number mismatch error been confirmed on any BoC polymer note?

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t-spoon64
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« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2014, 08:09:06 pm »

You don't have to feel that way. An excellent place to start is to look at the US Bureau of Printing and Engraving.

Here is a the link to the main website: http://www.moneyfactory.gov/

Here is a link to the production process: http://www.moneyfactory.gov/uscurrency/theproductionprocess.html

I am not sure if you have seen the videos from the Bank of Canada website. Although they do not specifically talk about the plate numbers you will get a good idea about the process.

And if you watch carefully you will see their Single Note Inspection system at work. These videos are found at:

http://www.bankofcanada.ca/banknotes/bank-note-videos/

One of the good books to get is the book published by the Bank of Canada called the Art of Bank Note Design.

Of course if you want to get a lot of technical information about the research done on skip numbers etc. I would suggest that you get access to the Canadian Paper Money Society publications. As a member you can get access to them on-line.

Good Luck



Thank you very much for the information  I will be looking into it.
BWJM
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« Reply #22 on: January 16, 2014, 09:48:24 pm »

I've heard letterpress mentioned (as in previous issues) but it looks similar to laser etching to me.

I heard the new twoonies are made by 3D printing.

BWJM
Member of CPMS, RCNA, ONA, ANA, IBNS, WCS.
President, IBNS Ontario Chapter.
Treasurer, Waterloo Coin Society.
Show Chair, Cambridge Coin Show.
Fellow of the Ontario Numismatic Association.
Rupiah
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« Reply #23 on: January 17, 2014, 01:11:36 am »


HBP 1027799, insert HBP 0784682, HBP 1026601
HBP 1029399, insert HBP 0786282, HBP 1029400
HBP 1030399, insert HBP 0787282, HBP 1030401
HBP 1030599, insert HBP 0787482, HBP 1032000
HBP 1031399, insert HBP 0788282, HBP 1029200


It looks as though these insert notes have different position numbers.  Does this mean that the printer just takes random regular notes from pile "A" to fill an order for pile "B"?

This is very interesting. For the above notes here are the ream nos and position numbers (ream no-position number) based on 200 skip starting at 0.000

114-49, 87-49, 114-44
114-38, 87-38, 114-39
114-24, 87-24, 114-25
114-25, 87-25, 114-14
114-29, 87-29, 114-38

This may reveal some interesting thing happening. Firstly the middle notes (078xxxx)  that are now reported as inserts as of Jan14, indeed fit the mould of sheet replacement with the first set of notes (xxxxx99). The notes following the inserts resume the pattern of the mixing of bundles.

So somewhere along the line a sheet replacement may be happening (presumably at the printers). Then when the notes go through the single note inspection they get mixed into bundles and some of these sheet replacements stay in those mixed bundles.


Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
Rupiah
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« Reply #24 on: January 17, 2014, 01:18:13 am »


HBP 1027799, insert HBP 0784682, HBP 1026601
HBP 1029399, insert HBP 0786282, HBP 1029400
HBP 1030399, insert HBP 0787282, HBP 1030401
HBP 1030599, insert HBP 0787482, HBP 1032000
HBP 1031399, insert HBP 0788282, HBP 1029200


The following notes are more than likely adjacent notes from the same sheet and will have a common border. If you still have them check it out. Its awesome to see the notes align at the border. If my estimation is right the bottom border of 1030399 will align with the top border of 1030599

HBP 1030399 (Plate no 24)
HBP 1030599 (Plate no 25)

Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
bricker
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« Reply #25 on: January 18, 2014, 10:02:08 am »

Interesting. Unfortunately they went back to the bank. Apart from the 5 UNC HBP inserts in the brick I kept 4 others:

HBP 1027777 49 49
HBP 1029201 38 38 (radar)
HBP 1030303 24 24
HBP 1030301 24 24 (radar)

and I found this record low SN in a later brick, but its creased:

HBP 0000543 43 43

so I now have TEN notes from this series, its time to start trading!    :)

mmars
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« Reply #26 on: January 22, 2014, 02:53:45 pm »

Did anyone else notice that the SNR ranges are still 1,000 notes despite the new information about $5 and $10 notes being skip-numbered by 200?
 ???

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