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Topic: e18-vii  (Read 3452 times)
iwantitall
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« on: June 28, 2014, 07:43:03 pm »

found this the other day . was wandering how common this is.

iwantitall
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« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2014, 07:44:22 pm »


friedsquid
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« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2014, 11:29:41 pm »

the dropped digits are pretty common....if you check on ebay they are everywhere



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walktothewater
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« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2014, 08:59:10 pm »

Quote
the dropped digits are pretty common....if you check on ebay they are everywhere

i agree in part...

Quite common on ebay but not that common in circulation. I've searched thousands of $20 for the SNDB and have only found 1 (the other came from a chance find of a friend's change). 

I think "Friedsquid" is trying to convey the fact that they're not worth a hefty premium (like some ebay sellers seem to seek). 

friedsquid
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« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2014, 04:53:56 pm »

i agree in part...

Quite common on ebay but not that common in circulation. I've searched thousands of $20 for the SNDB and have only found 1 (the other came from a chance find of a friend's change). 

I think "Friedsquid" is trying to convey the fact that they're not worth a hefty premium (like some ebay sellers seem to seek). 

Maybe not that common in circulation but very common in bricks...but true.... ebay sellers like to say how rare they are :)



Always looking for #1 serial number notes in any denomination/any series
mmars
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« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2014, 05:58:24 pm »

Maybe not that common in circulation but very common in bricks..

Almost everything is common in bricks.  ::)


ebay sellers like to say how rare they are :)

Saying something is rare is par for the course on eBay.  Every 1973 $1 note is as rare as every other.  O:-)

We had the discussion of dropped/raised digits before.  They are, technically, errors.  They're just not that spectacular or that rare.  But like everything on eBay, when one example sells for a surprisingly high price, the copycat listings start to mushroom and it takes a long time before things settle back down to normal.

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PaperorPlastic
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« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2014, 10:26:49 pm »

  I usually find a note like that every few weeks, though I have only seen 20$ notes with it so far.  Most of them I find have a few folds in them so I don't bother keeping them.  I guess to answer your question they are sort of common based on the number of them I've seen.

Rupiah
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« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2014, 11:06:35 pm »

found this the other day . was wandering how common this is.

I was of the camp that these notes are very common until someone pointed out to me that it depends on the level of misalignment.

Generally what is common is a  small misalignment. The type of misalignment shown in the example in the GPM catalogue I have not seen very commonly.

However a vast majority of this type of error notes sold on e-bay that I have seen are of the small misalignment type.

Unfortunately the GPM catalogue does not distinguish between the level of misalignment in cataloging the error and so for collectors it becomes difficult to distinguish.

I do find the level of misalignment shown in GPM catalogue worth collecting. I would not say the same of many of the ones on sale on e-bay.

Perhaps the editors of GPM catalogue should consider adding a note to that cat. no.

I would say a misalignment where the difference between the tops of misaligned and normal numerals is greater than half the height of the numeral should qualify as having some premium. Anything less and it probably would be too common to assign a premium.

Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
 

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