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Topic: Polymer SNR $10 found in circulation - 1 in 1M chance  (Read 6672 times)
wagnert89
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« on: March 24, 2019, 10:55:55 am »

I am happy to share this rare polymer $10 single note replacement (SNR) will not be destroyed by the BoC someday.  Finding a circulated 200 mintage $10 SNR is essentially a 1 in 1 million chance considering around 20 frontier series prefixes at 10 million notes per prefix divided by 200 mintage range.  Brick searches would have found snrs at high chances than going through 1 million circulated notes.  Anyways I thought I would share this cool find.

Dean
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« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2019, 11:56:11 am »

Nice find!  I hope to find some similar things when I go through the culls at my local bank next week...

Rupiah
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« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2019, 08:10:56 pm »

I am happy to share this rare polymer $10 single note replacement (SNR) will not be destroyed by the BoC someday.  Finding a circulated 200 mintage $10 SNR is essentially a 1 in 1 million chance considering around 20 frontier series prefixes at 10 million notes per prefix divided by 200 mintage range.  Brick searches would have found snrs at high chances than going through 1 million circulated notes.  Anyways I thought I would share this cool find.


Every single note with a prefix and a serial number is unique.

It is only because SNRs are listed in the catalogue that they become valuable.

I still have to find the research that all the SNRs in polymers are based upon.

On the other hand its good to see people get excited about collecting.

Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
wagnert89
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« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2019, 11:23:55 pm »


Every single note with a prefix and a serial number is unique.

It is only because SNRs are listed in the catalogue that they become valuable.

I still have to find the research that all the SNRs in polymers are based upon.

On the other hand its good to see people get excited about collecting.

SNRs are confirmed by BoC.  I think they are are pretty cool but I can also understand that it may not appeal to everyone.  That's why we all collect different notes.
 
walktothewater
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« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2019, 03:33:59 pm »

Quote
That's why we all collect different notes.

-for sure.  It's always very exciting (& personally rewarding) to pull something uncommon out from the wild.

Rupiah
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« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2019, 05:48:28 pm »

SNRs are confirmed by BoC.  I think they are are pretty cool but I can also understand that it may not appeal to everyone.  That's why we all collect different notes.

Neither the sheet replacements nor the single note replacements are confirmed by BoC at least for the polymers. If there is any information that says they are confirmed it would be highly appreciated if that is shared.

As a matter of fact the process (Single Note Inspection process) that is used for bundling $5 and $10 would mean that the BoC is saying there are no replacements. That is the reason why there are gaps in the bundles and have been every since the first bundles came out.

I appreciate that it is in the catalog and people collect whatever they wish. But there is no publicly available data that can verify this.

Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
friedsquid
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« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2019, 10:14:13 pm »


Quote
        Neither the sheet replacements nor the single note replacements are confirmed by BoC at least for the polymers. If there is any information that says they are confirmed it would be highly appreciated if that is shared.

As a matter of fact the process (Single Note Inspection process) that is used for bundling $5 and $10 would mean that the BoC is saying there are no replacements. That is the reason why there are gaps in the bundles and have been every since the first bundles came out.

I appreciate that it is in the catalog and people collect whatever they wish. But there is no publicly available data that can verify this.       


This does not pertain to polymer notes, but it may be of interest that the Bank of Canada did actually confirm an insert replacement note, when collectors were first discovering them.
See CPMS Newsletter, Dec. 2005, page 100.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2019, 10:17:55 pm by friedsquid »



Always looking for #1 serial number notes in any denomination/any series
Rupiah
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« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2019, 11:12:12 pm »


This does not pertain to polymer notes, but it may be of interest that the Bank of Canada did actually confirm an insert replacement note, when collectors were first discovering them.
See CPMS Newsletter, Dec. 2005, page 100.

I have seen that letter from Dec. 2005 and I believe it has formed the basis for many of the insert replacements. Independent observations of bundles did show evidence of insert replacement of sheets for journey series notes, particularly the sheet inserts.

But ever since the single note inspection process was introduced, (and the Bank of Canada has publicly indicated this was done with the $5 and $10 Frontiers Series/Polymer Notes and all notes printed since 2013), there was no need to replace notes that were found to be unsuitable for circulation at the time of packaging. Even the earliest bundles of the $5 and $10 Frontiers Series Notes had missing notes from a sequence similar to what we find in bundles today.

The Bank of Canada has not confirmed publicly or otherwise the replacement ranges of either the Polymer Series Notes or the Journey Series Notes.

The GPMC says that "replacement notes have been identified by researchers" Unless I am wrong the GPMC has never been able to get any specific information about all the replacement note ranges that are shown in the catalog, from the Bank of Canada.



Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
wagnert89
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« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2019, 11:20:36 am »

I agree, it would be nice if there was more information. Like someone else pointed out, the replacement finding discussion threads were removed (amoung other threads). 
Seth
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« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2019, 03:05:34 pm »

The Bank of Canada has not confirmed publicly or otherwise the replacement ranges of either the Polymer Series Notes or the Journey Series Notes.

The GPMC says that "replacement notes have been identified by researchers" Unless I am wrong the GPMC has never been able to get any specific information about all the replacement note ranges that are shown in the catalog, from the Bank of Canada.

I agree, without confirmation from the BoC, the "identified by researchers" method of confirming replacement ranges is fatally flawed IMO and I don't trust it. Note that I don't mean to say that I don't trust any specific person who may be involved in this process (individuals are not identified), it's the process itself I don't trust.

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wagnert89
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« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2019, 06:09:38 pm »

I know probably a dozen brickers that have found these notes.  It would be to hard to falsely claim over so many people.  You would not be finding these replacements in circulation if that was the case (they would keep all of the 200 notes in that range and sell them slowly).  The logic behind using "unmarked" replacements makes sense; Less wastage (like all the devil face replacements they printed and scraped).   It's not for everyone, that's why we all collect different things
« Last Edit: April 11, 2019, 06:26:14 pm by wagnert89 »
Rupiah
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« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2019, 01:00:53 am »

I know probably a dozen brickers that have found these notes.  It would be to hard to falsely claim over so many people.  You would not be finding these replacements in circulation if that was the case (they would keep all of the 200 notes in that range and sell them slowly).  The logic behind using "unmarked" replacements makes sense; Less wastage (like all the devil face replacements they printed and scraped).   It's not for everyone, that's why we all collect different things

It would be highly appreciated if the data from the birckers be shared publicly of course without naming the brickers. I come from a background of research and generally speaking something to be classified as research has to be available for peer review.

As another person has mentioned this is not to suggest that individuals are not to be trusted but there are possibly alternate explanations for these finds that can be tested. I can particularly say this for all the polymer notes printed with skip number of 200 which includes all of the 5's and 10's and other denominations printed after 2013.

Of course people can collect whatever they want and pay for it whatever the want. After all this is a very discretionary thing to do.

However one would hope that from a numismatics point of view there is a greater disclosure particularly if this is going to show up in GPMC and particularly when people in the numismatic world begin to think that this information is therefore verified as true by the Bank of Canada - when in fact it is not.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2019, 01:12:17 am by Rupiah »

Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
wagnert89
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« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2019, 10:40:30 pm »

I found another polymer SNR (this time a $5) in Ottawa today.  Note: only positive comments are welcomed.

« Last Edit: August 03, 2019, 08:32:36 am by wagnert89 »
 

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