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Topic: What would a matching serial number set of these be worth?  (Read 12066 times)
kid_kc79
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« on: December 31, 2020, 11:35:08 am »

Uncirculated set of two matching serial number $5 Journey Series banknotes with one a pre security issue and the other a security issue.


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AL-Bob
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« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2020, 01:39:00 pm »

Did you put these together yourself?  Just randomly?

I don't know about value but finding sets like these isn't as hard as you would think.  Take any 10,000 random notes and you are likely to find several matches.  It's not something you see offered much in Canadian notes but I've seen some US sellers selling not just two notes but 3, 4, 5 notes with the exact same (non-special) serial number.

If you wanted to put together a large number of sets like this you could use a counting machine that scans serial numbers and keep all the numbers in a database.  If you can keep an inventory of 10,000 or more notes (preferably well-distributed across different ranges) then it would be easy to just run all your bricks against existing inventory and pull out matches from pretty much with every brick.  If several people do this together they could increase their chances exponentially.


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kid_kc79
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« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2020, 01:49:19 pm »

Thank you very much, I was given an opportunity to buy this set and wanted to make sure I would offer a fair amount!

 

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AL-Bob
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« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2020, 02:19:39 pm »

Well, I wouldn't offer more than $30-40.  It's a novelty but not much more.


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Mortgage Guy
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« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2020, 02:25:04 pm »

These can be fun and interesting.

The first one here is a play off a 3 digit repeater ladder (Yup, made it up)

The second one is a play off Descending-Ascending ladder by 2 (Yup, made that one up but try to find these)



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Rupiah
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« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2021, 02:38:30 pm »

These can be fun and interesting.

The first one here is a play off a 3 digit repeater ladder (Yup, made it up)

The second one is a play off Descending-Ascending ladder by 2 (Yup, made that one up but try to find these)

The combinaiton of 4 notes is really nice.

I agree that it is not as easy as it sounds to make these things up. It is next to impossible.


Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
Rupiah
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« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2021, 03:02:44 pm »



I don't know about value but finding sets like these isn't as hard as you would think.

Quote from GPMC under N6 Matching Serial Number Sets

Quote
It is all but impossible to obtain a set of notes with matching serial numbers from circulation


Having said that I recall that several years ago there were a couple of sellers who had found bricks with matching numbers of the journey series 5's and 10's. This were being sold on ebay. In such cases I cannot anticipate paying a premium beyond what one would pay for a novelty item.

Although I do not believe it is all but impossible I think it is very difficult.


Wonder what paper money would say if it could talk?
friedsquid
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« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2021, 04:38:02 pm »

Mathematically I believe the odds in finding a matching serial number
Would be 1 in 10 million assuming both prefixes are full
Runs
Some one correct me if I am wrong



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friedsquid
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« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2021, 04:46:21 pm »

Quote
I don't know about value but finding sets like these isn't as hard as you would think.  Take any 10,000 random notes and you are likely to find several matches. 

Clearly you have never searched bricks
And your assumption is based on no experience in the matter
I have gone through literally tens of  millions of notes
And I can guarantee you it is not as easy as you think
And even the fact that you would have to keep every
Note you found until you found a match is not feasible for most
I agree it is a novelty but not one you will ever get in Unc or better unless your bricking



Always looking for #1 serial number notes in any denomination/any series
AL-Bob
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« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2021, 08:20:26 pm »

friedsquid, you are correct.  For any two random notes there is 1/10,000,000 chance that they will match, assuming they are from different full-run prefixes.  If they are from the same prefix, then your chance is zero so the actual odds are slightly worse than 1/10M.

However, if you have 10,000 random notes each note could potentially match against 9,999 other notes.  That's a total of 9,999  * 10,000 / 2 = 49,995,000 different combinations when you exclude the duplicates (A=B is the same as B=A).  So for a random sample of 10,000 notes you will get ~5 matches on average.  Emphasis on random.

Searching bricks, you will get mostly sequential notes so this won't work on it's own.  The key is you need to build up a large inventory of somewhat randomly distributed notes.  10,000 notes would be a good number and achievable with a modest amount of capital.  After that you will get ~1 match for every 1000 notes you look through.

It would be a piece of cake to find 100s of matches this way.  If you haven't succeeded it's because you didn't do it systematically.  You need to have a system because it won't happen on it's own.  I'm not sure what my lack of personal experience has to do with it.  It's just simple math.  I don't search bricks because it's not worth the trouble.  I'm just saying if you want to find these matches you could do it with a modest amount of effort.  The fact that we don't see too many of these is just because nobody has really bothered.


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walktothewater
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« Reply #10 on: January 01, 2021, 10:40:45 pm »

I have seen 2 online sellers (one from GB, the other Australia) sell sets of matching serial numbers (UNC) from their respective countries and they charge about the same as 2 radars for the set (but the # are not special). 

I understand Friedsquid's perspective as I've searched a few bricks & you got to have deep pockets to keep large quantities on hand (& to keep it going) but I've also seen World banknote sellers listing bundles (100), bricks (1000) of several currencies.  I would bet these people have a system (as implied by "AL-Bob) & if you have enough sellers cross-checking with enough inventory, I'm pretty sure getting matches wouldn't be too hard.

Obviously some collectors must want them (or they wouldn't be selling them). Not my "thing" but I realize that fancy serial numbers (like birthday # or birth years, etc) aren't really my "thing" either.  I've got a pretty narrow scope when it comes to special numbers.  To each his own I guess.

AZ
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« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2021, 09:02:07 am »

I have seen 2 online sellers (one from GB, the other Australia) sell sets of matching serial numbers (UNC) from their respective countries and they charge about the same as 2 radars for the set (but the # are not special).
It should be noted that in the case of Australia or England finding matching serial numbers is much, much easier. This has to do numbering: all notes on a sheet have the same serial number and different prefixes.
 

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