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Topic: Can a GEM 1954 $10 devil's face note have waves like these?  (Read 1107 times)
upc239
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« on: August 02, 2021, 10:08:37 pm »

Hi

I saw an auction on eBay and just curious if its normal to have wave's like these on a GEM bill?

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/274889142257





Just Bank Notes
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« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2021, 09:25:41 am »

Yes, absolutely!

Waves are caused by the heavy amount of extra ink used in printing the dark frames on the 1954 series notes.  These waves can be found on modified notes and Centennial $1's as well.

I found waves on a stack of devil $20's years ago and was educated by a good dealer/friend from New Brunswick.  He considered them "Original" notes.  The waves were in the the same pattern throughout the whole stack - makes sense from a printing point of view.  The notes simply dried that way.

Good grading companies recognize waves as a positive indication that notes have not been pressed.

walktothewater
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« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2021, 03:44:50 pm »

Quote
He considered them "Original" notes.  The waves were in the the same pattern throughout the whole stack - makes sense from a printing point of view.  The notes simply dried that way.

- I agree that that they're "original" & probably UNC but they don't look like GEM to me. I've seen this listing & neither front (nor back) is well centred.  The obverse is far off-centred (quite dramatically) more than the reverse.

Why do so many sellers forget whether the note in question is centred (or not) when describing their items? So I would suggest more like Choice Uncirculated 64 or even 63 but I'd have to see it in person.

alvin5454
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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2021, 08:15:32 am »

The ripples have nothing to do with the amount of ink. The notes were printed on wet or damp paper. When the sheets or notes dried, the ripples formed. They are a good sign of originality on all 954 notes in particular, including DF notes. They are essential for Gem Unc 65. Often no ripples means note is pressed and is no longer original.
Just Bank Notes
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« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2021, 11:01:21 am »

The ripples have nothing to do with the amount of ink. The notes were printed on wet or damp paper.

Moisture content of paper used during printing is consistent across the entire sheet and cannot explain ripples on one part of the note and absent elsewhere.  Ripples are caused by the amount of ink applied to suit bank note design.

I will leave the last word to Charlton.  The grade description for Gem Uncirculated states: “Early 1954 issues must have original paper ripples present in heavily inked areas.”
alvin5454
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« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2021, 08:38:32 am »

It seems CPMS formation offered is not good enough for this obvious newcomer to the paper money community. If you are ready to dispute an answer, why ask?   
From a long-time CPMS and forum member and contributor.


AL-Bob
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« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2021, 01:15:38 pm »

Alvin, I would have to concur with the "obvious newcomer" that the ripples are caused by the ink in this case.  This is what I've observed in the earlier '54 notes  (up to the mid-sixties).  I'm sure the wetness of the paper could also be a factor but my observation is that the "good" ripples that you want to see occur predominantly in the heavily inked areas.

Notes printed later in the series tend to be flatter, though, so lack of ripples isn't necessarily due to being pressed.  It should also be noted that not all ripples are good.  I would be cautious when the edge of the note is rippled as that might indicated damage from humid conditions.



AL-Bob(at)cdnpapermoney com
 

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