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Topic: 1969 $20 replacement notes  (Read 2318 times)
Caper1
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« on: January 11, 2007, 12:08:00 am »

The following four 1969 $20.00 Beattie/Rasminsky replacement notes
have been with me for a number of years.
     *EA, (one)  *EA, (one) *EA,, (two). (see photo inserts)
 I class them as BC-50aA? Right???

I'd be interested in general comments re their condition.
They're fairly crisp.

Also, would be interested in knowing whether one or more prefix is more common
both relative to each other (i.e. *EA, vs *EB, vs *EH) and
compared to the other prefixes in this group.

Photo labeled "D" appears to have the remainder of a smudge of "mud" on its surface.
that may be visible in the photo. (I vaguely remember dropping itand getting it wet)
I do have an idea of what the reply might be but I'll ask anyway ....
Could I clean it in any way?

At the moment I've stored them in an envelope.
Could anyone suggest  more appropriate storage?
N.B. My apologies if the photos are not included/inserted properly.





[edit]Added images as imageshack thumbnails. --BWJM.[/edit]
« Last Edit: January 11, 2007, 08:02:06 pm by BWJM »
walktothewater
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« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2007, 09:27:38 pm »

Quote
I class them as BC-50aA? Right???
Quote
Yes

I'd be interested in general comments re their condition
You are asking the impossible.  How can anyone judge the condition of a note without actually being there to inspect them?  When buying notes unseen it leads to all kinds of problems for that exact reason.  That subject has been well covered in past forums.
By looking at the scans they all look circulated, some less (maybe EF?) than others (VF?).

Quote
Also, would be interested in knowing whether one or more prefix is more common
both relative to each other
 While Charlton states that they each had a printing of 480,000 the *EH must be the most difficult one to find since its a bit higher in BV.  In UNC it books at $600 while the others are around $450 to $475 in perfect grades.  Despite what others may tell you about the "hot paper market" it can be difficult to actually realize book value on many notes.

Quote
Could I clean it in any way?
NO!  (if you do you-- you will lose whatever value they have in a big way!)

Quote
Could anyone suggest  more appropriate storage?
Mylar sleeves.  Many collectors here recommend storing them upright in cardboard boxes.  I use a good large ringed binder with page holders (the rings prevent too much pressure for pressing).
Caper1
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« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2007, 10:13:52 pm »

Thanks for your reply...  "walktothewater"

I appreciate it!

I understand assessing the condition of the notes via the attached photos would
not be a possibility;  i.e.  I could do a good job on them using Photoshop!.
I did read a few posts on condition of paper notes (I think on this forum)
that mentioned for example that the "number" of creases would effect its condition.
I'll have to do more reading...

Thanks also for giving some indication of their value ....
I'm parting with them, rather wondered if they were
worth keeping. I will.  
Also, I  wonder if a certification service such as ICCS certifies notes?
(I used ICCS (only once) to certify  a 1951CDN 5c "coin".) Such certification
would include (I presume) comments on the condition.

I'll look for Mylar to store them. I have some 3-ring  4x12 panoramic pages of the type
that hold the Advanced Photo "panoramic" photo prints - Supposedly "Photo Safe" - "PVC free."
May put them in these.

Caper1
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« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2007, 10:19:00 pm »

Agggg!  Correction to previous post ...
I'm "not" parting with them ...
BWJM
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« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2007, 01:11:03 am »

Quote
I'll look for Mylar to store them. I have some 3-ring  4x12 panoramic pages of the type that hold the Advanced Photo "panoramic" photo prints - Supposedly "Photo Safe" - "PVC free."
May put them in these.
http://www.cdnpapermoney.com/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.pl?num=1162168666
Click the above link for a source for Mylar sleeves.
Caper1
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« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2007, 03:59:45 pm »

Thanks!
walktothewater
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« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2007, 12:17:46 pm »

Quote
Also, I  wonder if a certification service such as ICCS certifies notes?
(I used ICCS (only once) to certify  a 1951CDN 5c "coin".) Such certification
would include (I presume) comments on the condition.

Do as you wish:

but IMO: although these replacement $20 notes aren't common, they aren't particularly rare with printing
numbers in the 400,000 range.  If you are going to pay for third party grading than you should think hard
about the potential demand of the note you're about to grade, and whether the cost to grade them is worth
the investment.

Many collectos don't consider the demand of a note and that could be their biggest mistake.  
They often look at the number of notes printed and  from there - presume its rarity/demand equates the catalogue value.  
The reality is-- you should also think about the number of collectors collecting a certain denomination, series, special numbers, errors, etc.  Many factors come into play.  For instance, I believe there are many more collectors who collect only low denominations ($1,$2,$5) rather than higher denominations ($50,$100,$1000).  Presently, in Canada at least, it appears as if there's more special number collectors than there are error collectors.

On another thread a collector has asked what his solid radar note would be worth.  He hasn't stated a condition but for a lower denomination (solid radar) it may be worth TPG (3rd party grading such as ICCS).    The same would apply to scarcer notes such as asterisk devil faces, 1935/37 radars, short prefixes, or rare signatures.  

Finally, if you're thinking about TPG, you should also consider how you're about to sell the said notes (eBay, live auction, yahoo, etc).  For some collectors TPG authenticates and boosts the notes value.  Others avoid TPG notes.  
 

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