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Topic: Banknotes with a story...post yours here too!  (Read 2215 times)
Dean
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« Reply #15 on: June 25, 2021, 08:36:43 pm »

This beaten up $1 came into my possession today in a group of notes.

The inscription “Laura +?” Is visible on the bottom margin.

I wonder who “Laura” was and who she was thinking about at the time.

Perhaps it was a young girl who scribbled on her lunch money in the cafeteria at school…

Dean
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« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2021, 11:42:57 pm »

This 1937 $20 has a dated teller stamp of January 6th 1956.  I wonder what was happening on that day?  And it is amazing to think that this note was in circulation after the 1954 modified notes were released!
« Last Edit: September 02, 2021, 11:45:33 pm by Dean »

Dean
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« Reply #17 on: September 21, 2021, 07:30:43 pm »

I purchased this 1900 shinplaster for my collection because somebody had written “New Years 1920” on the back of it.

I wonder why someone would have written on this note over 100 years ago…Perhaps it was given to someone on New Years day and they kept it as a souvenir.  Who knows?  If only these notes could talk…

Dean

moneycow
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« Reply #18 on: September 22, 2021, 03:29:04 pm »

I find handwriting extremely detracting to a notes appearance and I would never purchase one because of that...however you have given me pause to re-think my stance. Your note is certainly an acceptable exception to my rule.  Nice one.
Thanks for sharing.
Seth
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« Reply #19 on: September 26, 2021, 12:12:46 pm »

I purchased this 1900 shinplaster for my collection because somebody had written “New Years 1920” on the back of it.

I wonder why someone would have written on this note over 100 years ago…Perhaps it was given to someone on New Years day and they kept it as a souvenir.  Who knows?  If only these notes could talk…

Dean

Nice. New Year's 1920 was a happy time. After WWI and the Spanish Flu pandemic, people were looking forward to a new decade. The War Measures Act that had been invoked for WWI was still in place and was set to expire at midnight. Here are a couple of ads from the December 31, 1919 Vancouver Province on what that shinplaster might have bought:

Track your Canadian currency online!

http://www.whereswilly.com
Dean
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« Reply #20 on: September 28, 2021, 09:23:50 pm »

Nice. New Year's 1920 was a happy time. After WWI and the Spanish Flu pandemic, people were looking forward to a new decade. The War Measures Act that had been invoked for WWI was still in place and was set to expire at midnight. Here are a couple of ads from the December 31, 1919 Vancouver Province on what that shinplaster might have bought:

Those are cool newspaper clippings!

New Year's 1920...Over 100 years ago.  My great Grandfather came to Canada in November 1918--just after the armistice--The 1900 dated shinplaster was in general circulation at that time!  It's amazing to look at it and how long it has survived.

I am just a custodian of history...

Dean
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« Reply #21 on: October 20, 2021, 09:45:28 pm »

I purchased this 1937 $5 note…it has the names of three member of the same family written in nice cursive writing around the margins on the back of the note.

Joseph Lemire, Noella Lemire and Alfred Lemire.

Judging by the Coyne-Towers signatures on the note, it was printed anywhere between 1950-1954.
It may have remained in circulation until the late 1950s or early 1960s…or even later…who knows?

The Lemire surname seems to be fairly common…I wonder who these people were?

This is why defaced notes are so fascinating to me.

Enjoy!
« Last Edit: October 20, 2021, 09:48:03 pm by Dean »

Dean
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« Reply #22 on: October 25, 2021, 07:25:36 pm »

I found an autographed journey $10 and its consecutively numbered partner note in the mutilated pile at one of my banks today!

I was really surprised to find it, and saddened that somebody probably deposited a collection which is why these notes got crinkled up…. 😫

But, I am happy to have saved from the shredder this note signed by former Governor of the Bank of Canada, Gordon Thiessen!

It will be a highlight of my collection.

Enjoy!
Dean

Dean
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« Reply #23 on: November 15, 2021, 05:24:48 pm »

I got these roughed up $1 notes from one of my banks today.
They could be “friendship notes” that are torn in half, with each person keeping their half until reunited with their friend.

Or, they could be just plain old worn out notes that should have been returned for shredding.  In any case,  the one note clearly shows the damage that adhesive tape can cause to a note.

Maybe Seth has an opinion about these notes…

Enjoy!
Dean

Dean
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« Reply #24 on: November 15, 2021, 08:21:00 pm »

I purchased this amazing note for my collection and I was very excited to receive it today!

It is an impaired 1935 English $1 note that has a small stain and a small cut in the top margin.

However, it bears the inscription: “David Evans Mch 13, 1935”.

To history buffs, this note was autographed by this person only two days after the official opening of the Bank of Canada!. This note must have been one of the first Bank of Canada notes ever released into circulation…

This note is a jewel in my collection…I wonder who David Evans was?

Enjoy!
Dean

 

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